Ozformers Transformers Club of Australia


Go Back   Ozformers Transformers Club of Australia > Beyond the Spacebridge (Non-Transformers Section) > Non-toy stuff

Sightings/Sales

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #461  
Old 12th June 2017, 03:58 PM
griffin's Avatar
griffin griffin is offline
Rank 10 - Admin
 
Join Date: 24th May 2007
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 30,048
Default

I got over 450 spam emails over the weekend for a variety of medical products... must be a last minute surge to generate sales before the end of the financial year.
No idea what set it off - usually I get a couple a week... but this was insane.
I hope I didn't accidentally delete an important email, as it took me several minutes deleting them all individually to try to make sure I didn't.
Reply With Quote
  #462  
Old 12th June 2017, 04:46 PM
Ravagecat's Avatar
Ravagecat Ravagecat is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 14th Mar 2012
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 827
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinnertwin View Post
I may be too, actually, I probably am. The mrs insists on getting it checked, but self pride, machismo, red meat and all of the rest kick in.

Best one I had to date was when my Admin Manager, who was a soft-spoken Englishwoman, replied to a question & I thought she said "Why would you want to put Julio in the camel?"
You guys remind me of that episode of Seinfeld where he was dating a "low talker "

Maybe you need some of these?

__________________
"Today's Autobots are tomorrow's scrap metal!"

Click links to view my sales threads and feedback below:

Ravagecat's New Toy Sale
Ravagecat's Accessory Sale
My OTCA Feedback


Reply With Quote
  #463  
Old 12th June 2017, 06:47 PM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,299
Default

"Low talkers" are the most irritating when doing oral examinations. *sigh*
Reply With Quote
  #464  
Old 12th June 2017, 08:08 PM
Sinnertwin's Avatar
Sinnertwin Sinnertwin is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 7th Feb 2013
Location: 2164
Posts: 7,515
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravagecat View Post
You guys remind me of that episode of Seinfeld where he was dating a "low talker "

Maybe you need some of these?

I so do
__________________

LOOKING FOR MiSB
AOE VOYAGER NEMESiS PRiME.
Reply With Quote
  #465  
Old 12th August 2017, 07:27 PM
Megatran
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I'm waiting patiently in line at the in-store price check scanner station. The people in front of me scans the item. Scans it again. And a third time. Do they think the price is gonna change on the third scan? >_<
Reply With Quote
  #466  
Old 2nd October 2017, 07:09 PM
Trent's Avatar
Trent Trent is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 7th Mar 2012
Location: Wollongong
Posts: 5,778
Default

Watch. This. Now!
__________________
Dovie'andi se tovya sagain
Reply With Quote
  #467  
Old 5th October 2017, 01:10 PM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,299
Default

Super Random Thought:

Money in itself is inherently worthless. The value in money lies in what it represents - and in contemporary society, currency is backed by the value of its issuing country's economy. Money was invented because it's more effective than bartering. A shoemaker can't barter with other people who aren't in need of shoes, and a farmer can't barter when his crops aren't ready for harvest etc. Initially things of inherent worth were used as currency (e.g. precious things), but this became problematic when people started making huge purchases. Paying for land is impractical if you have to transport wagon-loads of silver or gold etc., then there's the problem of security. The Chinese were the first to invent paper money - the idea of a central authority securing precious assets and then essentially printing out notes that people could use at a later point in time to redeem those assets. But then people figured out that the assets never needed to be redeemed as people could literally trade in these government-issued "I owe you" notes. This idea transmitted along the Silk Road to Italy who then adopted it and it spread through Europe. The Europeans introduced the idea of banking, allowing assets to be deposited or withdrawn from branches rather than just a central location. But this still had problems in terms of the physical distance between branches and also trading between different banks. Today we can lose money when we exchange currencies from different countries, but back then people could lose money from exchanging currencies between different banks at the next town! And if a bank collapsed then that bank's currency would become utterly worthless. I think it was either the English and/or the Dutch ( not sure ) who introduced the idea of centralised government banking. Governments are far more secure and far less likely to collapse than banks, especially currencies from stronger economies - which is why these countries' currencies are worth more than those from weaker economies. Hypothetically speaking, if the Australian economy collapsed tomorrow, the AUD would become worthless. But precious things like gold and silver etc. would still be worth something because they have inherent value. Money doesn't. It's the purchasing power of money that makes it valuable.
Reply With Quote
  #468  
Old 5th October 2017, 01:38 PM
1AZRAEL1's Avatar
1AZRAEL1 1AZRAEL1 is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 4th Aug 2008
Location: The 'Riff
Posts: 9,717
Default

Ate an insanity wing at Memphis BBQ Pit in Penrith yesterday. The chilli in that was so damn hot I got high off it. I swear I could see sounds. Good luck to those brave enough, or stupid enough, to try their challenge
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #469  
Old 5th October 2017, 02:50 PM
Tober's Avatar
Tober Tober is offline
Rank 8 - Multi-Section Mod
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,309
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoktimusPrime View Post
Super Random Thought:

Money in itself is inherently worthless. The value in money lies in what it represents - and in contemporary society, currency is backed by the value of its issuing country's economy. Money was invented because it's more effective than bartering...

... It's the purchasing power of money that makes it valuable.
Money is an illusion - greatest lie ever told plus interest. Slavery is therefore legal.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mII9NZ8MMVM
__________________
Which brings us to where we are today...


Reply With Quote
  #470  
Old 6th October 2017, 08:49 AM
UltraMarginal's Avatar
UltraMarginal UltraMarginal is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 23rd Sep 2010
Location: Sydney
Posts: 7,864
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoktimusPrime View Post
Super Random Thought:

Money in itself is inherently worthless. The value in money lies in what it represents - and in contemporary society, currency is backed by the value of its issuing country's economy. Money was invented because it's more effective than bartering. A shoemaker can't barter with other people who aren't in need of shoes, and a farmer can't barter when his crops aren't ready for harvest etc. Initially things of inherent worth were used as currency (e.g. precious things), but this became problematic when people started making huge purchases. Paying for land is impractical if you have to transport wagon-loads of silver or gold etc., then there's the problem of security. The Chinese were the first to invent paper money - the idea of a central authority securing precious assets and then essentially printing out notes that people could use at a later point in time to redeem those assets. But then people figured out that the assets never needed to be redeemed as people could literally trade in these government-issued "I owe you" notes. This idea transmitted along the Silk Road to Italy who then adopted it and it spread through Europe. The Europeans introduced the idea of banking, allowing assets to be deposited or withdrawn from branches rather than just a central location. But this still had problems in terms of the physical distance between branches and also trading between different banks. Today we can lose money when we exchange currencies from different countries, but back then people could lose money from exchanging currencies between different banks at the next town! And if a bank collapsed then that bank's currency would become utterly worthless. I think it was either the English and/or the Dutch ( not sure ) who introduced the idea of centralised government banking. Governments are far more secure and far less likely to collapse than banks, especially currencies from stronger economies - which is why these countries' currencies are worth more than those from weaker economies. Hypothetically speaking, if the Australian economy collapsed tomorrow, the AUD would become worthless. But precious things like gold and silver etc. would still be worth something because they have inherent value. Money doesn't. It's the purchasing power of money that makes it valuable.
But precious things like gold and diamonds, don't really have any value either, only the perceived value that people apply to them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AZRAEL1 View Post
Ate an insanity wing at Memphis BBQ Pit in Penrith yesterday. The chilli in that was so damn hot I got high off it. I swear I could see sounds. Good luck to those brave enough, or stupid enough, to try their challenge
that's hot!
__________________
Ultramarginals Animated Wants List
my original collection from when I was more impressionable.
My Current Collection Pics (Changing on occasion)
My tentative foray into Reviewing Movie Human alliance Characters: Coming Soon
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 12:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.