Ozformers Transformers Collectors Australia


Go Back   Ozformers Transformers Collectors Australia > Beyond the Spacebridge (Non-Transformers Section) > Non-toy stuff

Sightings/Sales

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old 6th April 2012, 10:20 PM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jena View Post
I am ignoring romanji because I want to actually learn the language properly, like you said.

I have a couple of digital flashcard programs already but I need to do more learning before they become useful.
I taught myself Hiragana and Katakana just by cutting up two sheets of paper into palm sized squares as flash cards. Took me 30 min to memorise all the Hiragana and 60 min for Katakana. I was reading super-slowly, but at least I could recall each character and more importantly, not allowing myself to ever become used to reading Romaji.

When I was living in Japan I knew an American dude (a staff member in charge of looking after international students) who learnt Japanese in Romaji. At the time I met him he'd be living there for some 8 years or so... his spoken Japanese was fluent... but he could NOT read any Japanese text at all (not even Hiragana). He told me that he'd become too dependent on Romaji and just couldn't ween himself off it no matter how he tried. And as fluent as his Japanese was, I later realised that it wasn't as fluent as it should be for someone who'd been living in Japan for so long... and of course it was his Japanese illiteracy that was holding back the development of his spoken Japanese.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jena View Post
Oh boy, my house is going to become covered labels now, that's such a good idea. The people I live with are going to hate it
Hmm... if you're in a shared accommodation situation you might wanna check with your sharemates first. Maybe just start with your own room - use small discreet labels. You don't need to be able to read them from afar, just whenever you're near them or using them. For example a former colleague of mine (who's a Japanese native) was learning Italian and he'd labelled everything in his home with stickers in Italian - each label with size 12 font Times New Roman in upper case. Just before he finished working with us (he was a casual) our staffroom's microwave died, so he gave us a spare from his home. While the sticker has long fallen off the door, the Italian word for Microwave has become the adopted name for our microwave oven. Whenever we get a new teacher in our faculty (e.g. casual, praccie, intern) I say, "This is our microwave, Microonde."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ode to a Grasshopper View Post
Seriously, how can a Japanese course for people who are guaranteed to be in Japan not use furigana, and/or the occasional kanji? It starts three or four months into the job fer crying out loud!
Seriously, if you get over here don't bother signing up for the CLAIR language course, it's a major waste of time.
IMHO the best way to learn Japanese if you're in Japan is to just hang out/party with locals. I learnt way more Japanese from 飲み会 than any book!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ode to a Grasshopper View Post
and it's all Standard Japanese so if you make it over here on JET there'll almost definitely be some regional differences in your hometown.
Unless your hometown is in Kanto (as mine was).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ode to a Grasshopper View Post
People will still understand and be able to use Standard Japanese just fine (it's the official national language, and is used for keigo or polite/formal speech), but most places here have their own regional dialects which can be a bit or even quite different.
Everyone understands 標準語 (ひょうじゅんご), but a few people don't (won't) speak it. When we were in Osaka there was a Chinese restaurant across the road from our hotel. The manager was an immigrant from Shanghai who's been living in Osaka for 22 years; she married a local man and they have kids etc. -- now she speaks 大阪弁 just fine, but because she learnt the language as an adult and wasn't schooled in Japan, I don't think she learnt 標準語... cos I kept speaking to her in 標準語 and she kept speaking back to me in 大阪弁! (my daughter was even more confused as she'd never had someone speak to her in 大阪弁 before!)

Then when we were in Kyoto my daughter spoke some Japanese to this one store attendant, who "corrected" her 標準語 into 京都弁! Mind you, it's widely known that Kyoto people are rather proud of their dialect which they consider to be the old traditional/imperial language of Japan (as Kyoto was the former capitol of Japan until the Edo Period).

So yeah, sometimes you get people who don't/won't speak 標準語 for one reason or another... but they are admittedly quite rare. 99.9% of the population can/will speak 標準語 if you can't speak their local dialect (although they may do so with a local accent). And sometimes people just accidentally slide into their hometown dialects (force of habit). I had a friend in uni who was from Osaka and while the rest of the people in our circle of friends would speak 標準語, she'd often slip back into 大阪弁. e.g. one time we'd just finished eating at a restaurant and the plan was to head off to Karaoke afterward, so she turned to me and said, 「カラオケに行かへん?」 - I just automatically replied in 標準語, but a second later realised that we just had a bi-dialect conversation!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ode to a Grasshopper View Post
Osaka-ben is better, obviously.
お前何言ってんだよ、ウィリス?
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 6th April 2012, 10:36 PM
jena's Avatar
jena jena is offline
Rank 1 - New/Inactive
 
Join Date: 25th Jul 2011
Location: Mildura
Posts: 709
Default

30 minutes!? I spent an hour with my nose in a hiragana chart today and I literally only remember a and n.

The people I live with are used to my crazy antics, they won't care if I label everything. They know me well.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 6th April 2012, 10:46 PM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,270
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jena View Post
30 minutes!? I spent an hour with my nose in a hiragana chart today and I literally only remember a and n.
Well with those two Hiragana alone you can now read/write in Hiragana the Japanese word for red bean paste! Congrats!

Flashcards work a lot better than staring at a chart.
What I did was to go through each card in order from beginning to end, then end to beginning; each time I'd look at the hiragana character and challenge myself to remember it without looking at the back for the answer. I'd say what it was out loud to myself, then turned the card around to check my answer. Then I turned the cards around and looked at the Romaji and traced the Hiragana in the air, then turned the card to check my answer. Then I shuffled the cards and did it all over again in random order, then reshuffled and did it again and again and again.

The problem with just looking at the chart is that all the Hiragana is in order and of course you have the Romaji for each character sitting right next to them (or if not you can guess what they are because of the order). The beauty of flashcards is that they hide the answers from you, and you can randomise it.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 6th April 2012, 11:25 PM
Ode to a Grasshopper's Avatar
Ode to a Grasshopper Ode to a Grasshopper is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 19th Dec 2008
Location: Tasmania
Posts: 2,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoktimusPrime View Post
Unless your hometown is in Kanto (as mine was).
JET tends not to send ALTs to many places in Kanto and/or big cities, it's usually pretty 田舎 (inaka/countryside). I really got lucky getting the outskirts of Osaka.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jena View Post
30 minutes!? I spent an hour with my nose in a hiragana chart today and I literally only remember a and n.

The people I live with are used to my crazy antics, they won't care if I label everything. They know me well.
It took me about a month-odd to memorise all the hiragana/katakana, though I was working full time and getting settled in as well and I'm often a really lazy student who gets distracted easily. My advice (the way I did it) is just work on sets of 5 at a time, and do both hiragana and katakana.
i.e. get あ/ア い/イ う/ウ え/エ お/オ down pat, then move onto か/カ き/キ く/ク け/ケ こ/コ etc. etc.
Note also that the font/style of the text can really change how the characters look, especially for characters like ko and ri in my experience.
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 10th May 2012, 10:58 PM
Ode to a Grasshopper's Avatar
Ode to a Grasshopper Ode to a Grasshopper is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 19th Dec 2008
Location: Tasmania
Posts: 2,653
Default

From here...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoktimusPrime View Post
I'm sure your Japanese will be totally ぺらぺら long before next year.
The Japanese is going slowly but surely. I'm further along than I thought I'd be (I can hold simple conversations in mostly Japanese, with a fair bit of dictionary hunting), but juggling study with full-time teaching work and trying to live a life as well is tricky - especially since I've taken on a heap of extra work at my shogakko. Couple that with being a terrible procrastinator as a student and it's very much slow and steady. I give it another year before I'm pera-pera-ing away with any noteworthy degree of competency, and maybe another year after that before I'm what you could stretch to call 'good'.
On the upside, my kids' English is getting really good. My 6nensei shogakko kids from last year have started at my chugakku this year and their English is leaps and bounds ahead of the 2nensei kids, and a few of the 3nensei students as well. So, you know...not great for my Japanese study, but by all indications doing damn well at my actual job.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 11th May 2012, 12:14 AM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,270
Default

Glad to hear your students have done well. But dude... put down the dictionary and books. Get out there, hang out with Japanese people who speak bugger all English and socialise! Seriously, that's how I learnt most of my Japanese. Learning a language is like learning how to swim or ride a bicycle... sure, you can study theory from books and stuff (yawn), but nothing beats just doing it! More fun too.

You'll be amazed at how quickly and efficiently you can learn just from regular spontaneous conversations with native speakers. And try to find Japanese speakers who don't speak English -- which is really easy in Japan! If anyone asks to practice English with you, just politely decline -- simply tell them that you only speak English in class, but otherwise you didn't travel thousands of kilometres to live in Japan just to speak a language that you could be speaking back home! Another tactic is - if someone keeps speaking to you in English. And it doesn't have to only be with Japanese people -- you can also speak Japanese with other Westerners too. When I was living in Japan I frequently had contact with other Australian students -- and at one stage, most of us agreed that we would just stop speaking English with each other and just speak exclusively in Japanese. It was weird at first, but we got used to it. One person didn't want to do it -- we tried to talk to her in Japanese, but she kept replying in English. Result: her Japanese improved the least amongst all of us.

I know that it's hard when you're required to speak English at work -- but when you're outside of work, just treat the English language like plague and try to avoid it as much as you can. Surely most of your work colleagues don't speak English. Even if they do, just speak to them in Japanese.

Another difficulty for you too is the "hidden linguistic racism"... by this I mean, Japanese people often speak slower and more clearly to Gaijin like you than they do with Gaikokujin like me. I'm sure that they don't know that they do this, but I find that they do (have you noticed this?). I think it actually comes from them being too polite... they see a white person and think, "Aww look, he's trying to speak Japanese... I'll be nice and speak slowly and clearly to help him understand." -- which may feel really useful at first, but in the long term it actually delays your learning of the language because, let's face it, native speakers don't speak methodically slowly or clearly! They speak fast and slur lots! But as your Japanese improves, and once Japanese people realise that you are fluent and capable of understanding what they're saying, they'll soon stop patronising you with slow and overenunciated speech and just talk to you normally. And to be fair, not every Japanese person does this... but some of them do.

I sometimes encounter the reverse of this in Australia where I meet some white people who try talking to me slowly, overenunciated pronunciation and worse of all, loudly! Even if my English was no good, why shout?? I do find that at least Japanese people are good in that they don't think speaking louder and louder is going to make themselves more intelligible. It's a language deficit, not a hearing impairment!

Have faith in yourself dude. I have faith in you, and I'm serious when I said that you'll be ぺらぺら by next year! You can do eet!!
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 12th May 2012, 07:24 AM
Skript's Avatar
Skript Skript is offline
Rank 5 - Dedicated Member
 
Join Date: 27th Jun 2010
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 202
Default

You were right Gok, it's pretty active here =)

Flash cards are always nice.. But i really only used them for the ones I really couldnt remember.
I used to write down on two pieces of paper, one for Katakana and one for Hiragana and have all the A, I U, E, O, KA, KI.. etc written in English.
I'd look at a book for 10 minutes, then go. For the ones I constantly failed on, I'd go to the flash cards. Easier to remember the silly little pictures/ expressions.
Katakana was fun though. I remember I used to go into Toys R Us when the Beast Machines Return line was out, and i'd spend literally an hour trying to say the name of characters (who i knew) but just trying to pronounce them, then ask the staff what the name was.

Best learning: Drinking with friends (or even strangers). Verbal learning + drinks = fun!
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 12th May 2012, 09:14 AM
GoktimusPrime's Avatar
GoktimusPrime GoktimusPrime is offline
Rank 6 - Deluxe Member
 
Join Date: 27th Dec 2007
Location: Sydney NSW
Posts: 33,270
Default

飲み会 FTW!
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 12th May 2012, 05:02 PM
jena's Avatar
jena jena is offline
Rank 1 - New/Inactive
 
Join Date: 25th Jul 2011
Location: Mildura
Posts: 709
Default

My Japanese learning is coming along quite well, slowly but surely and I don't get to spend much time studying which makes the progress slower. I've memorized the hiragana by just practicing writing over and over and saying them aloud. The flashcards I made haven't even been used. But that's okay, I want to learn to read, write and speak Japanese so this way has been the best way for me. I also have a few Japanese learning games on my phone which I use to test myself or to just play during breaks at work. I'm currently working on the greetings and learning the first vocabulary list in Genki. I can introduce myself in Japanese which is fun! I love little things like that, it feels good. I'm seeing one of my friends who studies Japanese at uni at the end of the month so maybe by then I can have a brief conversation with him.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 12th May 2012, 07:28 PM
Skript's Avatar
Skript Skript is offline
Rank 5 - Dedicated Member
 
Join Date: 27th Jun 2010
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 202
Default

I love Genki, great book =)
Workbooks pretty good too!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 08:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.